5 Steps to Overcome Failure & Use it to Springboard to Your Next Big Thing

5 Steps to Overcome Failure & Use it to Springboard to Your Next Big Thing

Overcome failure

How to overcome failure and use it to springboard to your next big thing

Chances are you have failed on at least one occasion in your life.

Success is often born from failure. See it as a life lesson & come back stronger than before.

What separates those with a “winning” attitude from those with a “losing” attitude is how you see your failure.

While you may not be able to prevent failure you can control how you react to it. It’s normal to be upset when you fail. I’m not saying to ignore your feelings. Allow yourself to feel the anger and emotional upset but do not wallow in fear and hide.

Persevere: It’s okay to fail as long as you fail fast and go straight to plan B.

Choose to use see your failure as a “life lesson” and use it as a springboard to your next big thing and you will feel more empowered and in control of your life and less like a victim.

Feeling like a victim is lot like jumping into a boat without oars. It’s a bad move that won’t get you anywhere.

There are no victims, only volunteers – you always have a choice. –Unkown

In 2008 after the collapse of Wall Street my profession crumbled under my feet.

From 2008 on my income was cut in half year after year after year until I was living off my hard earned savings. I eventually I sold my home to get out of debt and so I wouldn’t go broke. It was hard to give up my dream house and move but you know what? No one said “boo” about it. The only noise I heard came from in between my ears.

The great thing that came out of it was that I was so eager to find a new profession where my destiny was under my own control that I decided try blogging. My first blog was born in 2008. It was pretty awful and I knew it.

Since my background was in banking and finance and I’d been trained in financial planning I decided I would be the next Suzie Orman. I set up a website dispensing financial advice but I soon grew bored and began writing what was in my heart; personal-development articles. Eventually I walked away from it. It’s hard to keep up your enthusiasm for a topic you aren’t interested in.

I learned a lot and when I finally decided to start my second blog in 2010 my past experience made all the difference in making Powered by Intuition a success.

Failing as a “financial blogger” was the springboard to my next big thing. Here’s why:

1. I realized I hadn’t followed my heart (my intuition) when I decided to be a financial blogger. This realization was the catalyst for starting Powered by Intuition.

What You Can Do: Listen to your intuition and follow your heart so you go with the flow instead of against it. Doing something purely for the sake of making money (unless you love it) will burn you out. Listening to your intuition is how you will find that thing that lights you up. Here’s a secret for you…..the reason you’re attracted to “that thing that lights you up” is because inside you already possess the talent and ability to do it! You wouldn’t be pulled toward doing it unless it was already a talent innate to you so, the point is….you’re meant to do it.

2. Forcing myself to post on my financial blog was a lot like going to work every day. It wasn’t what I really wanted to be doing. I found a million other things to do just when I was about to sit down to write.

Here’s A Clue: Forcing yourself to be a “round peg in a square hole” is a big clue! Where are you doing this in your life? This area may contribute to a downfall so act as soon as possible to get on the right track in your life. Remember, you have to have a burning desire to do whatever it is you want to do or it will always feel like work and drain you. When you zero in on what lights you up your life will flow much more easily because even when you encounter challenges and setbacks (and you will) you’ll have a stronger desire to work through them.

3. After a few months I ran out of inspiration to write for my financial blog. I was a subject matter expert but I wasn’t passionate about it. You have to be passionate about what your doing.

Find your WHY: Passion and being on-purpose along with business savvy are mutually important factors in success. There’s an ongoing debate between whether you should follow your passion or not. I believe you need to be inspired by what you’re doing and what inspires you is what you have a passion for. You need to have an underlying reason why you’re doing it – and it can’t be just “to make money.”  The “why” will sustain you and feed you to apply creativity to the product creation and problem solving aspects of your business.

4. I had no training as a blogger–and it showed. I didn’t know that blogging was different from the freelance writing I’d been doing for local newspapers and magazines. Having a blogging mentor after I started PbI was one of the smartest things I did. I learned the real ins and outs of how to get traffic, write for a blog, SEO, keywords and much more.

Get a mentor: There are mentors who have done whatever it is you want to accomplish. Don’t waste precious time trying to figure it out yourself. Get help early on in your venture. Do not talk yourself into waiting until you make the money to afford a mentor. This is a huge mistake. The way to succeed is to learn what works the first time. Doing it on your own doesn’t mean you can’t succeed it just ensures that you will take much, much longer because you’ll make mistakes that set you back.

5. When I was writing my first blog I was alone on the world wide web. There was no one to comment on my posts and no one to “talk shop” with. Most of my “real life friends” had no clue nor any interest in what I was doing. They were flummoxed by the amount of time I was putting into my new venture. Joining a community of people I found support, mentorship and like-minded people who had the “blogging itch” like me. I consider some of these people to be among my best friends now even though we may be separated by thousands of miles.

Don’t go it alone: Joining a community of like-minded people bolsters your confidence and helps you achieve your dreams. They “get” you even when your own family or friends don’t. This is really important if you are going to be among the small percentage of new ventures that succeeds. If you listen only to the “nay-sayers” you’re going to give up before you give yourself a fighting chance to succeed. 

Of all the things I do in my online business writing about intuition and personal-development is always at the top of the list along with private client work. I’m so grateful for my failure as a financial blogger…and for the fire the collapse of Wall Street put under my feet to find something else to do with my life or I wouldn’t be here writing this today.

How do you see your own failures? Are they life lessons? Did you use them to springboard to your next big thing?  

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Image: Georges Seurat Wikipedia Commons