Dig Deep & Unearth the Roots of Your Creative Genius

Dig Deep & Unearth the Roots of Your Creative Genius

You have to dig deep to unearth the roots of your creative genius but it’s worth it.

Digging Deep by Fran Sorin

 

Today I’m celebrating the 10th anniversary of Fran Sorin’s groundbreaking book, “Digging Deep.”

I loved “Digging Deep” and can’t recommend it enough if you are searching for the roots of your own creative genius.

The updated 10th Anniversary Edition of Digging Deep: Unearthing Your Creative Roots Through Gardening is a powerfully uplifting and transformative self-help book for the creatively and spiritually challenged. Overflowing with tips, exercises, and resources, Fran shares the lessons she’s learned from gardening over the past thirty years. If you’re yearning to cultivate more meaning and connection in life, the 7 Stages of Creative Awakening mapped out in the book will help you extinguish the stifling inner voice that says, “I’m not creative,” and replace it with strategies that will help you harness your instincts and live a life filled with joy and creativity.

1. What inspired you to write Digging Deep?
I was on all fours in the garden weeding one day when out of the blue, I realized that the transcendent state that I frequently experienced in the garden was similar to what I used to experience while playing the piano throughout my childhood and into adulthood. It is what Maslow calls ‘peak experience. It is this sweet spot—where you lose any self criticism or restraint, let your imagination run wild, take risks, improvise, and play – all the while being mindful of what you’re doing. This extraordinary state of being is where your creativity has an opportunity to jump in and take over.

Once I put the pieces together, the light bulb went off: I saw that this is how I had been creating my gardens for the past several years and wanted to share my passion for the creative process in the garden- and life- with others.

2. In Digging Deep you ask the question, “What does it mean to be creative?” So let me ask you, “What does it mean?”
Creativity is simply the energy of making something new where there was nothing before. We have the potential to do this in so many unmarked ways—from designing our schedules to fashioning our ‘look’, writing birthday cards, to building a business from the ground up. Lawyers create arguments, decorators create ambiance, and parents create everything from learning to a sense of wonder. Every time we get dressed, make dinner, or wrap a gift, we can be creative. In almost everything we do in life, we have the possibility of conjuring up the spirit of inspiration, imagination, innovation, and resourcefulness.

Creativity is not something we do; it’s something we embody. I believe the ultimate goal is not to be more creative, but to learn how to live creatively.

3. What would you say to someone who thinks they’re not creative?
The first thing I would do is ask them why they feel that way. And then I would listen to their story of why they are living with this ‘non-truth’.
I would then ask them to share a time with me in their childhood when they remember using their imagination and being creative. It could be acting in a play, designing their own Halloween costume, decorating an Easter egg—children are so naturally creative that when a person starts remembering wonderful times from their childhood, some awareness of the ‘playful self’ begins to break through.

Once the ice is broken and an individual opens up, there’s an opportunity for them to look at how they may already be creative in certain areas of their life that they’re not even aware of. It also allows for an opening to discuss ways that they might want to awaken their senses and learn more about living creatively.

And finally, I would leave them with the following: that even if they don’t think they’re creative, every day remind themselves that they are. Write some affirmations and place them around the house and work place about your creative essence…..something simple like “Every day I am creating a joyful and beautiful life.”

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4. In Digging Deep you talk about the 7 Stages of Creative Awakening. Could you tell us a little bit about them?
Sure. The 7 Stages of Creative Awakening is a term I developed that leads someone step by step through what I consider to be the creative process. The stages are: Imagining, Envisioning, Planning, Planting, Tending, Enjoying, and Completing. Although I developed them with the garden in mind, in truth, they can be used in all areas of life.

For example, Stage One is Imagining: The Sparks of Creativity. Within the framework of that one stage are chapters on Observing, Discovering, Remembering, Exploring, Opening to Possibility, and Playing. In each chapter, I break down the behavior being discussed, share personal stories, and include hands-on-exercises so that the reader can begin practicing and integrating these new elements into their daily life. I call it exercising your ‘creativity muscles’.

5. What simple steps can someone take, right now, to be more creative in their daily life, as well as in their garden?
I would suggest that you do something new every day. I use a phrase ‘Try it new.’ If you’re used to driving to work one way, go another. If you ask your kids the same questions every day after school, come up with some new questions (believe me, they’ll be surprised). If you’re in the habit of dressing conservatively at work because you think you should—well, gosh darn it, go out and buy the purple silk scarf or bright red tie that you’ve been yearning for and wear it—with a big smile on your face.

Make a pact with yourself that you’re going to do something new every day and follow through on it. It doesn’t have to be a big thing at all. But bit by bit, day by day, the small changes add up.

 

Digging Deep Book cover

FRAN SORIN is the Author of Digging Deep: Unearthing Your Creative Roots Through Gardening – Special 10th Anniversary Edition. Fran is a Renowned Gardening Expert, Passionate Gardener, Deep Ecologist, Inspirational Speaker, Ordained Interfaith Minister, Soul Tending Coach, and CBS Radio News Contributor. CONTACT INFO: For Media Queries & Event/Booking Info Email: Fran.Sorin@gmail.com  Visit her website at: www.FranSorin.com

How To Use MindMapping To Stay Creative & Intuitive Everyday

How To Use MindMapping To Stay Creative & Intuitive Everyday

How To Use MindMapping To Stay Creative & Intuitive Everyday

How to Create a Mind Map

By guest contributor Virginia Cunningham.

Humans are by nature creative. Sometimes, however, we need a little help to unlock our true artistic potential.

Using mind mapping can not only help you get a clearer picture of your ideas, it can also encourage you to focus and expand on those ideas. As an enhancing tool – mind mapping enhances your creativity, your intuition and problem solving skills. On top of all of that, it enables you to better understand yourself and your strengths.

Essentially, mind mapping is a technique that uses a diagram to map out information in a visual manner, in which there is a main category in the center of the map, branching out into subcategories in a hierarchical form.

Thus, you can relate and group information together efficiently; it is a structural format to force you to think outside of the box. As it is visual, it keeps you engaged to concentrate on your thoughts.

Mind mapping is a great way to brainstorm, organize and keep track of goals and objectives, and make those artistic connections.They can spark breakthrough ideas and intuitive connections of where content should be and how content relates – you can visually see if your thoughts are in the right place.

Sometimes your mind doesn’t follow the conventional way to solve a problem; however, at times, following the norm can become repetitive and mundane. If your gut or intuition tells you to do something in a different and innovative way, perhaps you should follow that instinct.

With the help of a mind map, we can better understand our ideas and develop solutions. In understanding our ideas, we learn and know more about ourselves and our place in life.

Just like our intuition, sometimes our creativity can be elusive because we don’t pay attention to it or use it often enough. Your creative spirit may be dormant; however, you can awaken it through the use of a mind map.

How to Mind Map2

A mind map can help you obtain a better grasp of your creativity, pull experiences from the past and present, and utilize your overall physical, mental and emotional resources. The end result of your mind map focuses on the roots in your intuition – your creativity and intuition combined provide you with that unique angle and approach to your work to creatively solve problems in your life.

With a mind map, you can take a moment to look at a visual depiction of your thoughts, make sense of it and pay more attention to the right side of the brain we refer to as the more creative and intuitive side of our brain that we tend to ignore.

A mind map is a creative connection of the intangible to the tangible. Mind maps provide visual confirmation to the thoughts running through your mind. When you flex your creative muscles, you put your feelings to paper and your perceptions are expanded. You can step away or hone in on external stimuli and turn random thoughts into an actual process.

Use a mind map everyday when sorting out thoughts to serve as a visual guide to the connection between your creativity, your intuition and intuitive guidance. Creativity and intuition are linked so, working with a mind map will not only help expand your creativity it will also help you to develop your intuition as well.

What tools and techniques do you use to enhance your creativity? If you’ve tried mindmapping how has it worked out for you?

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P.S. Easily enhance your creativity by developing your intuition: Click here!

Virginia Cunningham is a freelance writer from California whose writing covers a range of different topics, including health and supplements, dining and travel and business and marketing.

Photo credit: flickr.com/commons

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