5 Intuitive Questions to Root Out Your Money Hang-ups

5 Intuitive Questions to Root Out Your Money Hang-ups

Success is not a destination Zig Ziglar

How to Use Your Intuition to Root Out Your Money Hang-ups

Has going from employee to entrepreneur been harder than you thought?

Are you finding it difficult to charge what you’re worth?

Are you surprised at not getting the results you expected?

If you answered yes to any of these questions you’re not alone in fact, you’re in good company. Most entrepreneurs suffer a shock to the system when they go from employee to entrepreneur. Self-employment brings up all the unresolved issues you have about your worth, deserving and ability to receive.  And, if possible it’s best to get these hang ups cleared out before you go solo.

Be prepared to suffer “growing pains” throughout the life cycle of your business. The truth is that in order for your business to grow you must also grow and develop the ability to achieve at higher levels. This means not only acquiring new business skills but the mental and emotional capacity to confidently be seen and take action on a bigger stage.

So how do you know if you have money hang-ups? If the money isn’t flowing in your business even though you’ve implemented all the right business and marketing strategies then it’s highly likely that money hang-ups are the culprits causing you to self-sabotage.

Money hang ups are tell tale signs that your internal growth hasn’t kept up with the challenges of your external growth and ambition. If the money you desire from all your efforts isn’t flowing into your business the first place to look is your internal beliefs around your worth, deserving and ability to receive. It doesn’t matter how much strategy you have under your belt either. Money hang ups do not discriminate on the bases of knowledge.

5 Questions to Intuitively Root out Your Money Hang ups

Instructions Step 1: Go somewhere quiet where you won’t be disturbed, take a few relaxing breaths and answer the following questions:

1. Do you feel there’s a mismatch between your plentiful education, training, certifications and what you’re earning?

2. Do you feel you should be farther ahead by now?

3. Are you applying all the right business and marketing tactics but still not getting the results you expect?

4. No matter how much you accomplish do you always focus on how much is still left to do?

5. Do you feel more comfortable giving (compliments/gifts) rather than being the recipient?

Go deeper with your intuition

Step 2: Record only the Yeses. Review each YES and ask yourself “Why?” As you do see what thoughts, feelings or memories come to mind. Go with the first thoughts, memories and associated feelings that come up. These will likely be big clues as to what the root of the problem is. When you work with intuition often your first thought is correct.

Change your story

Step 3: Once you have an intuitive feel for where your money hang ups are and what they are telling you change the story. Rewrite it with a better ending – the one you wish had happened. Forgive yourself for any mistakes you might have made. Look back with fresh eyes or perhaps through adult eyes if the memory was from childhood and see the truth about yourself as you are now, not the child you once were. Tell yourself now that you know better you’ll do better next time. Release your old story and free yourself.

Be an advocate for yourself

Step 4: Get clear on what needs to change in order for you to succeed. Ask  yourself what you’re tired of putting up with? Take a stand for yourself and your business and take action.

Do you lack business strategy and marketing skills? Hire a mentor to help you work on implementing those aspects of your business.

Could you do with some energy clearing to finally remove the money hang ups for good? Hire a mentor to help you eliminate the psychological obstacles blocking your path to your success.

Celebrate how far you’ve come!

Money hang ups aren’t the end of the world because they don’t have to be permanent. They’re red flags that point to what aspects of yourself still need work, compassion and TLC.

What did you discover about yourself? What aspects of yourself do you need to focus on in order to clear your money hang-ups?

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P.S. Learn how to use your intuition: Click here!

Photo: Fotolia umbrella ©Sergey Nivens

 

The Downward Spiral of Wallowing in Dark Emotions

The Downward Spiral of Wallowing in Dark Emotions

Wallowing in Negative Emotions, Living a problem free life

The Downward Spiral of Wallowing in Your Dark Emotions

Have you ever been pulled way down into your dark emotions, so much so that it was hard to snap out of it?

There are times in life when “bad” things happen that throw us into a tailspin emotionally. Events such as bankruptcy, divorce or the loss of job, to name only a few, can take us to the depths of despair.

After the shock wears off our despair is compounded by flooding fears about our own survival and safety followed by perpetual worry.

We worry about how we are going to pay our bills, feed our family, where we will live, the decisions we have to make, completing paper work, filing papers, dealing with the legal system, making phone calls and going on interviews and on and on.

But, eventually thank goodness, most survive such challenges. And hopefully we not only survive and thrive but we learn a lot about life and ourselves from going through challenging times too.

A Slippery Slope

The trouble starts when we stay at the emotional level of the problem long after it has been resolved and the situation concluded. Living in this state reshapes the brain and imprints upon it a deep neural pathway where we automatically react to everything that occurs with this dark heavy negative outlook.

We are in a state of continually waiting for the “next shoe to drop.” Nothing is ever okay again, or “good” and nothing really makes us happy; forget about seeing the positive side of life or that our glass is half full when this is the mental state of our being.

There are other events such as losing a loved that bring us to these depths too but normal grieving is not what I’m referring to here. Mourning can go on for months or even a few years and it’s part of the healing process in the stages of grief. If it goes too long and the person remains morose about life in general then it can become part of this same syndrome of wallowing.

Brooding makes things worse

A person I knew was passed over for a promotion. For months every evening after work they sat in the dark drinking until it was time to go to bed. They were angry and all they wanted to do was brood over how unfairly they were treated.

A casual remark that it was a beautiful day caused them to turn to me with a menacing sneer and say, “Is it?” It was like a scene out of the film, “The Shining” with Jack Nicholson. I could see the anger glinting in their eyes. How dare I be cheerful when they were morose and life was so horrible?

They finally snapped out of it when they got a new job. But, there was a good six months where they just wanted to brood.

Brooding was how they reacted to everything that happened in their life. This behavior pattern automatically took over in response to any stressors. The brooding response had been ingrained so deeply over the years that they truly weren’t able to just “snap out of it.” It was beyond their control but they weren’t willing to seek the professional help that was necessary to overcome it either.

This is why you need to be aware of the downward spiral of wallowing in your dark emotions. You want to be able to shift out of them before they become deeply imbedded response patterns.

**If you have a mental illness, a condition such as bipolar disorder, or clinical depression this requires professional help and you must seek a qualified therapist.

Nip it in the bud

In my practice I see this once in a while. People will come to me for a session when they are in the throes of dealing with the aftermath of challenging event. After the session they feel more confident that things are going to work out and that life will return to a new semblance of “normal.”

Then, I may hear from them a year later and they are still in this negative mindset. They are not over what happened and living in a state of anger, fear and negativity. When we speak again they respond to any suggestion of positivity by bringing up the problem and pointing out how it’s preventing them from being happy again.

Down the rabbit hole

The pull of negative emotions is strong. It’s easy to allow the dark side to take over. And when we are angry and upset it feels good – at first. Initially expressing our anger and venting it is fine. It’s healthy to let it out and get it off our chest but at some point we need to let go of it so we can move on with our lives. We also need to be aware that if we don’t let go of it we may be creating a negative emotional response pattern that will get harder and harder to overcome with time.

How to Snap Out of Wallowing in Your Dark Emotions:

1. Make a gratitude list. List all the things that you have to be grateful for and that are going right.  Choose to see the good qualities of the people in your life. Write out this list daily. The action of writing will help you connect to all the good you have in your life. Notice something new each day to be grateful for and add that to the list.

2. Shift your focus to the positive. What you focus on expands. When you keep focusing on negativity your mind sifts and sorts through every detail of your day to bring “forward” to your awareness more things to be negative about.  You must shift your focus so that then you condition your mind to bring “forward” all the good in your life.

3. Breathe out the dark emotions. When you feel overwhelmed by negativity stop and focus on breathing. It’s easy: Breathe in through your nose and hold the breath for three counts then let it out through your mouth. Do this five or 10 times and you’ll break the cycle. Tell yourself you are breathing out all the negativity. (Make focused breathing part of a daily routine of meditation and you’re sure to avoid the slippery slope.)

4. Get moving. Go for a walk or a work out. Skip rope, jump on a trampoline or take a swim. Exercise helps the body produce endorphins, chemicals that your body releases which elevate your mood. When you move your body you will naturally begin to feel better.

5. Create a mental trigger. When you feel yourself going down that spiral do something to shift your mental state. An easy thing to do is have an affirmation that you repeat over and over to break you out of the cycle. Try this one: I am now and forever happy, healthy and grateful for my wonderful life. You can make up your own. Think of it as a “band aid” to immediately stop the “emotional” bleeding.

Can you see why nipping prolonged negativity in the bud is a smart thing? How do you deal with snapping out of a negative emotional state? Share with us.

If you enjoyed this article show it to a friend. Use Twitter, Google+ or Facebook to let them know about it.

P.S. Being more in touch with your intuition prevents you from going down that rabbit hole. Learn more – click here.

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The Sensitive Person’s Guide to Overcoming Fear, Indecisiveness and Inaction

The Sensitive Person’s Guide to Overcoming Fear, Indecisiveness and Inaction

Sensitive woman

Are you a “sensitive” person? Do your fears undermine your confidence, create indecisiveness and lead to inaction?

Not sure if you’re a sensitive or not? There are a number of definitions of a sensitive. Here’s mine from my own experience:

The sensitive person is a highly perceptive person. They are acutely aware of the subtle nuances in their environment and the atmosphere around them. They are all too aware of the feelings of others. Sensitives pick up on cues that many people overlook such as the subtle changes in tone, facial expression and emotions of the people they are with and gain insight and meaning from these subtleties. They empathize deeply with others and not only understand but experience what others are feeling. In other words, they are extremely intuitive.

Being a sensitive person has its pros and cons.

On the pro side I believe that perceiving so many more layers to reality than meets the physical eye contributes to creativity and imagination. It’s also extremely useful when sizing up a person or situation. You gain insight quickly due to this extended sense of awareness.

One of the major cons I have found from my own life experience is that having a sense that isn’t often shared by others has made me feel odd and misunderstood at times especially, by my family.

When I was a child I was deathly afraid of the dark and for good reason. I saw and heard things that frightened me that my parents assured me were not there. No matter how hard I tried to convince them that what I saw was real they attributed it to shadows in the dark and insisted it was just my imagination.

Even if you didn’t perceive other realms of existence but grew up highly sensitive and quite open to sensing the emotions of the people around you that too might have made you feel odd and misunderstood for claiming to know things that you, according to other people, couldn’t possibly know. For example you might have sensed that the neighbor across the street was someone to be avoided. You “knew” he was ill intentioned even if, thankfully, nothing ever happened to prove you right.

The thing is that when you are a sensitive and picking up on things that others do not perceive, unless your perceptions are supported, you grow up convinced that you cannot and should not trust your own senses. This erodes your confidence in being able to trust yourself to make decisions. After all, everybody says that what you perceive isn’t real so you must be crazy or odd, right? That is what happened in my case and what I refer to as “sensitive person’s syndrome.”

If you were continually told that you were being “too sensitive” all the time or that it was “all in your imagination” by the authority figures in your life you might have decided that it was wrong to trust your instincts. And, of course by instincts I mean intuition. This would have set you up for lifetime of feeling fearful, indecisive and and or resorting to inaction when faced with having to make an important decision.

“Sensitive persons syndrome” could also translate to a fear of authority, a fear of being in a position of authority (for fear of being wrong) and a fear of taking responsibility for yourself and your decisions. The fear of making a decision or taking responsibility undermines confidence. The result is a constant second guessing your decision and changing your mind from one minute to the next, followed by doing nothing because you are so fearful of being wrong.

There is a way out of this syndrome though so read on.

Here’s a guide for the sensitive person on how to overcome fear, indecision and inaction once and for all:

1. Believe in yourself. The first step is to begin to believe in what you perceive – even if others do not. You are not crazy nor do you have an “over-active” imagination. There is so much more to reality than most people perceive. You just happen to have a more expansive experience of the world around you than most.

2. Stop trying to fit in with the crowd. The more you try to act as if you are what other people might call “normal” the more extreme your “sensitive person’s syndrome” will become. You learned at an early age it wasn’t safe for you to share your perceptions/intuitiveness with others. Your friends or family mocked or shamed you so you learned to protect yourself by hiding your sensitivity. Try to limit the time you spend around such people as much as possible.

3. Find like-minded people to hang out with. It is so important to be around other “sensitives.” For the most part I believe that “sensitives” are “intuitives.” Join a community, club, or meet up of other sensitives/intuitives where you can experience truly being yourself without any fear. For example, the Powered by Intuition comments section and FB page is a safe haven for intuitives to interact with one another.

4. Embrace your sensitivity. Your greatest attribute is your sensitive soul so show it some TLC. Be thankful for your heightened sense of awareness and the information it supplies about your environment. The more you accept this part of yourself the more comfortable you will be in your own skin and the easier it will become to make decisions. The indecisiveness from second guessing yourself will lessen. And so will the resulting inaction. It’s the pushing away of this sensitivity that has made making decisions a nightmare for you.

5. Develop your intuition. Believe it or not this is what has helped me the most. The more you develop your intuition the more confident you will become. Each time you trust your instincts/intuition to make a decision and it turns out well you will become more confident. And, the more confident you are the easier it will be to trust what you perceive the next time and the time after that when making decisions. Developing your intuition is about learning to trust those whispers within and honoring the information your finely tuned perceptions gift you with.

An easy way to begin to honor your sensitivity and heighten your intuition is to listen to a guided meditation that takes you by the hand and shows you what trusting these whispers feels like. The Intuition Principle Guided meditations do just that.

After all, you wouldn’t have this sensitivity if you weren’t meant to use it. So use it and be proud of it!

Are you a “sensitive?” How has it affected your life? Has fear, indecisiveness or inaction been a problem for you?

If you enjoyed this article share it with a friend on Twitter, FB or Google+.

P.S. Here are some more great tools to help you develop your intuition. Click here!

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